The Twisted Metal Sculptures of John Chamberlain Shine at Pace and Gagosian

John Chamberlain installation view at Pace Gallery

Anytime the Spring Contemporary Art auctions are near you can be sure they will be ushered in by Chelsea’s elite trumpeting the blue-chip stars of their rosters. The scrap metal master sculptor John Chamberlain is one of the most visible artists this month with large solo shows at both Pace and Gagosian galleries.

John Chamberlain, All That Is Lovely In Men, 2002 at Pace Gallery

Since the 1950s, John Chamberlain is best known for creating sculptures from old automobile parts that bring the Abstract Expressionist style of painting into three dimensions. His singular method of putting these elements together led to his inclusion in the exhibition “The Art of Assemblage,” at the Museum of Modern Art in 1961, where his work was shown alongside modern masters Marcel Duchamp and Pablo Picasso. Chamberlain had his first retrospective in 1971, at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. A second retrospective was organized in 1986 by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

Chamberlain was represented by The Pace Gallery from 1987-2010. The current exhibition is survey of his work over those years from the 1980s through the 2000s.  The exhibition at Gagosian, on the other hand, celebrates the addition of Chamberlain to the all-star roster of artists represented by Gagosian Gallery and focuses on new sculptures created over the past year.

John Chamberlain installation view at Pace Gallery

John Chamberlain at The Pace Gallery, 545 West 22nd Street, is open from April 15 through July 1st, 2011. Log onto www.thepacegallery.com for more information.

John Chamberlain New Sculpture is at Gagosian Gallery at 555 West 24th Street from May 5th through July 8th, 2011. Log onto www.gagosian.com for more information.

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Comments
One Response to “The Twisted Metal Sculptures of John Chamberlain Shine at Pace and Gagosian”
  1. Eugene perry says:

    I’m a sculptor and i’m not a big fan of John Chamberlain’s work. Looks too much like it took no skills and was produced by a child

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